Archives

  • Indian Public Policy Review
    Vol. 2 No. 6 (Nov-Dec) (2021)

    In the sixth issue of 2021, Ritika Juneja, Ranjana Roy, and Ashok Gulati take stock of the agricultural sector -the past achievements and future challenges - in India's 75th year of independence. Vijay Kelkar, Arvind Datar and Rahul Renavikar's paper analyses the present structure and operation of GST and makes a number of proposals to simplify the tax, reduce its cascading effects, lower the compliance burden, and improve revenue productivity. Arnab Mukherji documents the size of the economic impact of the pandemic on various child-specific schemes in Karnataka and proposes a prioritisation framework. Sneha et al perform an in-depth analysis of the causes and consequences of indecision and risk aversion in the Indian bureaucracy. M Govinda Rao writes a review article based on Madhav Godbole's book "India – A Federal Union of States: Fault Lines, Challenges and Opportunities”.

     

  • Cover page of IPPR Vol1 Issue1

    Indian Public Policy Review
    Vol. 1 No. 1(Sep-Oct) (2020)

    IPPR is a peer-reviewed, bi-monthly, online, and an open-access journal, which will carry original, analytical, policy relevant papers, book reviews, and commentaries, inter alia, Economics, Political Science,  International Relations and Security, Political and Defence Strategy, and Science and Technology Policy.

    The current issue has Rangarajan – Srivastava article on the policy options for India to emerge from the pandemic, Panagariya’s article listing the reforms needed to achieve a fast pace of industrialisation and accelerate economic growth. Patnaik and Sengupta analyse the impact of the pandemic on India’s fiscal situation. Menon and Kotasthane emphasise the need to go beyond discussions on defence expenditure to make strategic shifts in military planning. Govinda Rao reviews the recent book by Kelkar and Shah, In Service of the Republic from the perspective of the role of the State in the market economy.

  • Indian Public Policy Review
    Vol. 3 No. 2 (Mar-Apr) (2022)

    In the March issue, Sajjid Chinoy and Toshi Jain look at the macroeconomic impact of increased global oil prices and offer mitigating policy recommendations. The paper by Shivshankar Menon examines the links between the history we choose to tell ourselves and its implications for national security in India. D Narayana analyses the size of the state governments and efficiency of the Agriculture Department by comparing the number of employees per unit area under cultivation in Kerala with that in Karnataka and Telangana. Anil Kumar Vaddiraju's paper looks at the extent to which urban governments in India and China have moved from traditional government to network governance. T Selvaraju studies the level of parliamentary control over public finance in India and concludes that there is disproportionately lesser parliamentary oversight over public revenue compared to public spending.

  • Indian Public Policy Review
    Vol. 2 No. 1(Jan-Feb) (2021)

    IPPR is a peer-reviewed, bi-monthly, online and an open-access journal, which will carry original, analytical, policy relevant papers, book reviews, and commentaries, inter alia, Economics, Political Science, International Relations and Security, Political and Defence Strategy, and Science and Technology Policy.

    In this issue, Devashish Mitra explores the role of trade in faster job creation and economic growth in India and provides policy recommendations to facilitate this. S Mahendra Dev’s article examines the recent agricultural laws and its impact on farmers’ income, while suggesting further reforms required in the sector. Suyash Desai’s paper argues that the development and demonstration of maritime power affords India the best way of managing China in the Indo-Pacific region. D Narayana and Shagishna K analyse the role of religious faith in financial exclusion in India. Finally, Sharmadha Srinivasan and Prakhar Misra aim to establish  the issues with fiscal marksmanship of states’ revenue budgets.

  • Indian Public Policy Review
    Vol. 3 No. 4 (Jul-Sep) (2022)

    In the July issue of 2022, Barry Eichengreen, Poonam Gupta and Tim Marple review the arguments for the issuance of a Central Bank Digital Currency for India and review India's progress with other countries. Kevin James, Kandarp Patel and Anoop Singh's paper examines the key areas in which India needs Public Financial Management reforms and charts a comprehensive way forward for achieving it. Using constituency-level information, the paper by Vivek Jadhav examines how social diversity, religious diversity, and fractionalization affect the electoral outcomes in a First-past-the-post system. In her paper, Renu Kohli analyses some vital aspects of India’s flexible inflation targeting (FIT) regime and recommends further testing over different economic cycles before claiming success of the regime. Manoj Kewalramani reviews "How China Sees India and the World", the latest book by Shyam Saran.

     

  • Indian Public Policy Review
    Vol. 2 No. 3 (May-Jun) (2021)

    IPPR is a peer-reviewed, bi-monthly, online and an open-access journal, which will carry original, analytical, policy relevant papers, book reviews, and commentaries, inter alia, Economics, Political Science, International Relations and Security, Political and Defence Strategy, and Science and Technology Policy.

    In this issue, C Rangarajan and D M Nachane examine the role of monetary aggregates in the determination of inflation, which has important implications for monetary policy. In their paper, Niranjan Rajadhyaksha and Prakhar Misra examine how the new flexible inflation targeting framework has worked in practice in India, five years after it was introduced. The paper by M S Sriram scrutinises the speeches delivered by RBI leadership and examines the policy discourse to understand the elements of continuity and change. Prateek Waghre analyses India’s ongoing farmer protests movement through the lens of the Radically Networked Societies (RNS) framework. Finally, Sneha P describes the various ethical and methodological considerations when choosing to adopt RCTs for policy decisions in the Indian context. 

  • Indian Public Policy Review
    Vol. 3 No. 6 (Nov-Dec) (2022)

    In the final issue of 2022, M Govinda Rao's paper argues for reforms in budget management and the creation of an independent fiscal council to monitor the implementation of rule-based fiscal policy to impart effectiveness to fiscal management. Binod Kumar Behera and Hrushikesh Mallick's study tries to empirically evaluate the effects of fiscal deficits on the economic growth of 14 major Indian states from 1980-81 to 2019-20. The paper by Anindita Roy Saha and Gargee Sarkar examines the recent trends of environmental protection expenditure in India and finds a visibly lower share of EPE in total expenditure and lower rate of growth in comparison to other expenditure items of the government. The article by T Selvaraju aims to ascertain whether the Comptroller and Auditor General of India (CAG) functions as per its given mandate and makes recommendations to reorganise and strengthen the institution to better serve its purpose. Finally, Rohan Pai reviews Recaliberate: Changing Paradigms, a book by NK Singh and PK Mishra.

  • Indian Public Policy Review
    Vol. 2 No. 5 (Sep-Oct) (2021)

    IPPR is a peer-reviewed, bi-monthly, online and an open-access journal, which carries original, analytical, policy relevant papers, book reviews, and commentaries, inter alia, Economics, Political Science, International Relations and Security, Political and Defence Strategy, and Science and Technology Policy.

    In this anniversary issue, Shikha Dahiya et al. note the growing centralisation in India's human capital interventions and instead suggest a more decentralised and targeted approach within India's federal structure. Vivek Jadhav's paper measures and analyses the political concentration and inefficiency that characterise the disproportionate representation caused by the First Past The Post electoral system followed in India. Aarushi Kataria examines the content of over a thousand press releases by the Government of India during the COVID-19 crisis and argues that they served as a mechanism for the government to shape narratives in a manner that showed it in a positive light. Damodar Nepram and James Konsam explore how India's North Eastern states benefitted from the introduction of the Goods and Services Tax. Finally, Anantha Nageswaran reviews Paul Blustein's book "Schism: China, America and the fracturing of the global trade system".

  • Indian Public Policy Review
    Vol. 3 No. 1 (Jan-Feb) (2022)

    The first issue of 2022 begins with a paper by Barry Eichengreen, Poonam Gupta, and Rishabh Choudhary, which looks at the preparedness of India and other emerging markets for the next round of US Federal Reserve tapering. Renu Kohli examines India's demonetization episode and concludes that it does not meet the established principles of policy credibility. In their paper on corporate tax incidence, Sankarganesh Karuppaiah and Shanmugam show that India's corporate tax has a significant adverse impact on both wages paid to employees and profit after tax. In the context of SARS-COV-2, Shambhavi Naik and Aditya Ramanathan examine the drivers and constraints on bioweapons use and the ways in which it could be employed. The paper further proposes steps that a renewed Bioweapons Convention can take to mitigate the risk of bioweapons attacks. Madhav Godbole writes a review article based on Ranjan Gogoi's book "Justice for the Judge: An Autobiography".

  • Indian Public Policy Review
    Vol. 1 No. 2(Nov-Dec) (2020)

    IPPR is a peer-reviewed, bi-monthly, online and an open-access journal, which will carry original, analytical, policy relevant papers, book reviews, and commentaries, inter alia, Economics, Political Science, International Relations and Security, Political and Defence Strategy, and Science and Technology Policy.

    The current issue has an article by Viral Acharya on the impact of fiscal dominance on financial stability, monetary policy, and the economy. Bibek Debroy's article outlines the Constitutional and governance issues to prepare the country for emergencies like the pandemic in the future. The performance of the Indian education system in its entirety is scrutinised in an article by R. Radhakrishna.  The article on vaccination strategy by Shambhavi Naik et al. proposes a plan to vaccinate 80% of India’s population by December 2021. Govinda Rao reviews "India Unlimited: Reclaiming the Lost Glory" by Arvind Panagariya. 

  • Indian Public Policy Review
    Vol. 3 No. 3 (May-Jun) (2022)

    In the May issue of 2022, Ajay Chhibber looks at the history of economic planning in India and why Niti Aayog needs to get back to "new planning" for India to achieve SDG goals. The paper by Shanmugam and Shanmugam addresses the issue of designing equalisation transfers from the union government to states. Priyadarshini and Sabyasachi Kar inspect the challenges and opportunities arising from the adoption of a CBDC by India. Jos Chathukulam and Manasi Joseph's paper explores the conditions under which health grants by the union government to local governments can fall prey to the Mission Creep syndrome. V Anantha Nageswaran writes a review article based on the book ‘The Weirdest people in the world’ by Joseph Henrich

  • Indian Public Policy Review
    Vol. 2 No. 2(Mar-Apr) (2021)

    IPPR is a peer-reviewed, bi-monthly, online and an open-access journal, which will carry original, analytical, policy relevant papers, book reviews, and commentaries, inter alia, Economics, Political Science, International Relations and Security, Political and Defence Strategy, and Science and Technology Policy.

    In this issue, Pravin Krishna reviews India’s experience with Free Trade Agreements over the last two decades. Arvind Panagariya and Vishal More show that poverty reduction in India is not merely an artifact of a low poverty line. Liu, Sanyal and Singh analyse economic policy failures and its adverse impact on the environmental quality in Punjab. Deepika Kinhal and Apoorva explore the concept of mandatory mediation as a solution for reducing pendency in the traditional court system. Finally, Narayan Ramachandran reviews “Backstage: The Story Behind India’s High Growth Years” by Montek Singh Ahluwalia

  • Indian Public Policy Review
    Vol. 3 No. 5 (Sep-Oct) (2022)

    In this issue of IPPR, Ashima Goyal's paper analyses issues important in adapting flexible inflation targeting (FIT) to emerging markets like India. The paper by Saon Ray, Piyali Majumder, Vasundhara Thakur, and Ayush Patel offers an assessment of the sectors that will be impacted most by India making a transition to a low carbon economy. Vivek Jadhav and Brinda Viswanathan investigate the extent to which 103 sub-state regions within 20 Indian states exhibit income convergence. In their paper, Shivakumar Jolad and Chaitanya Ravi call for a greater alignment of Western paternalistic frameworks with Indian socio-political context in understanding alcohol consumption and alcohol related government policies. Finally, Pranay Kotasthane writes a review article based on Dr. Govinda Rao's book Studies in Indian Public Finance.

     

  • Indian Public Policy Review
    Vol. 2 No. 4 (Jul-Aug) (2021)

    IPPR is a peer-reviewed, bi-monthly, online and an open-access journal, which will carry original, analytical, policy relevant papers, book reviews, and commentaries, inter alia, Economics, Political Science, International Relations and Security, Political and Defence Strategy, and Science and Technology Policy.

    In this issue, Poonam Gupta and Dhruv Jain review India's experience with capital flows and provide policy recommendations to effectively deal with risk-off times. In his article, Nitin Pai traces the history of the Swadeshi idea from its origin to the present day and argues that India's national interest is better served by acquiring capability than self-reliance. Michael Metelits looks at the interwoven history of the colonial government's famine policy and the evolution of the Poona Sarvajanik Sabha as the principal critic. The paper by Anirudh Tagat et al adapts existing theoretical frameworks of social norms and their interactions with laws to study the case of rule violations in Indian road traffic. Finally, Aditya Pareek reviews books about American naval power by Capt. Henry J  Hendrix and Seth Cropsey